Upcoming Virtual and In-Person Educational Events for Patients and Medical Professionals ➜ VIEW NOW

What Is Keeping You Ill?

EPISODE SUMMARY

Complex chronic illnesses have increased exponentially over the last decades. In this episode, Damon Ernst talks with Dr. Eric Gordon, MD, about some innovative therapies he uses to rebalance the body and heal chronic illnesses.

EPISODE NOTES
The rising tide of chronic illness in our country today is a major cause of concern. It’s a growing epidemic that is only getting worse.

Picture this, 60% of adults 18-65 years and 90% of adults above 65 years have at least one chronic illness.

Finding and treating the root causes by looking at the whole system will get us out of this deep chronic disease hole we find ourselves in.

But there is reason to feel encouraged…

There are many wonderful doctors that are doing some amazing work in empowering people to deeper, long-term healing. And on this podcast, we are determined to bring them to you.

Today, we have Dr. Eric Gordon, the president of the Gordon Medical Research Center and the founder and owner of Gordon Medical Associates, specializing in complex chronic illnesses.

We talk about a wide range of topics spanning from COVID, Lyme disease, chronic fatigue syndrome, and mast cell activation syndrome.

Dr. Gordon emphasizes that for most people with chronic illnesses, it is not the original bug that keeps them sick. It is their body’s compensation for the illness that is the problem.

So what is the solution?

Tune in to learn of the unique approach that Dr. Gordon uses to heal his chronic patients and lots of other important health tips!

Key Takeaways:

  • Dr. Gordon’s journey in medicine (01:48)
  • What is keeping you ill (04:17)
  • Public Health vs. Medicine (10:53)
  • Rebalancing the immune system (15:30)
  • All about Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (21:48)
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (28:01)
  • What your body is telling you (32:32)
  • How stress makes you sick but also gets you well (35:27)

SHOW CONTRIBUTORS
Dr. Eric Gordon
Damon Ernst

Complex Chronic Illness, Eric Gordon MD

Pre-Tox: 5 Things You Must Do Before You Detox

We are so glad you were able to join us for the Mycotoxins and Chronic Illness Summit! The conversations and connections that followed were nothing short of life changing. As a follow-up to the Summit, we wanted to share this video with you with important information about detox and “pre-tox.” Please feel free to share this video of useful tips with anyone who may need them.

You can watch the video interview mentioned by Dr. Parpia or read the full transcript at the link: Underlying Factors of Chronic Fatigue – Dr. Jill Interviews Dr. Nafysa Parpia

5 steps to detox

Since your inner biochemistry and environmental toxin load is unique to you, we recommend personalized detoxification strategies rather than a one size fits all plan. Check out the post Six Essential Tests Before Detoxing to learn more about this important topic.

If you are interested in investigating these matters more deeply for yourself do get in touch with us! We look forward to hearing from you.

Drs. Eric Gordon and Nafysa Parpia

Detoxification, Eric Gordon MD, Nafysa Parpia ND, Toxicity

Four Ways Mold Can Affect Your Health

Nafysa Parpia, ND with input from Jamie Kunkle, ND

The Mycotoxin and Chronic Illness Summit is over. There was so much important information, it can be hard to know where to start. Today we are giving an overview of the kinds of issues that mold can cause.

Some people are affected by mold illness in multiple different ways that need to be addressed. In every case, removal from the exposure is critical. Following are the ways in which mold exposure can manifest clinically: 

  • Mold Allergy – Immune system reaction to mold exposure. Usually, removal of the mold exposure source will also remove symptoms.
  • Mold Toxicity – Many molds generate mycotoxins and biotoxins that impact several of the body’s systems. Simply removing the source of the mold exposure may not be sufficient to remove symptoms, as the toxicity has already started the process of inflammation and can continue in the body even after exposure has been discontinued.
  • Mold Colonization – Beyond the initial exposure comes a possibility of colonization, where mold becomes a resident within the living system, colonizing the surfaces of the body in the sinuses, lungs, GI system, and/or on the skin. Colonization does not reach into the deeper tissues, but now becomes an ongoing exposure to allergens, mycotoxins, and biotoxins and will complicate the impact. Even if the environmental source has been removed, exposure continues inside the body. 
  • Mold Infection – In very rare cases, when a patient’s immune system has been damaged by chemotherapy, AIDS, or other immunosuppressive factors, mold may infect tissues deeper in the body than what is seen with colonization, causing severe acute infectious disease.

Symptoms of mold exposures are many and can mimic and exacerbate those from other complex chronic illnesses such as Tick-Borne illness and other chronic infections, environmental toxicity, cognitive decline and neurological disorders.

Common Mold Exposure Symptoms

  • Confusion, disorientation
  • Difficulty in word finding
  • Impaired concentration
  • Difficulty assimilating new information
  • Reduced task completion
  • Hypersensitivity to bright light
  • Night blindness
  • Tearing, redness of the eyes
  • Blurred vision
  • Chronic aching muscles
  • Joint pain, morning joint stiffness, pain in weight bearing joints
  • Nausea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Weight gain
  • Abdominal pain
  • Chronic sinus congestion
  • Chronic cough that mimics asthma
  • Shortness of breath
  • Ice-pick like pain, or shooting electrical pain
  • Nosebleeds
  • Metallic taste or other unusual taste
  • Vertigo, dizziness
  • Ringing in the ears (tinnitus)
  • Rage or inappropriate anger, mood swings
  • Panic attacks or anxiety, depression
  • Tingling, “needles and pins” sensations
  • Increased sensitivity to touch
  • Difficulty with sleep: getting to sleep difficulties, difficulty staying asleep
  • Excessive thirst, or frequent urination
  • Impotence
  • Irregular vaginal bleeding
  • Low body temperature
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Low blood pressure
  • Chronic yeast infections
  • Early onset of menopause

Every generation has accumulated but often unseen toxic burdens that can affect their health and wellness. We have survived and adapted under substantial duress and adversity as a species. However, there are limitations on an individual’s health and functioning as these burdens continue to accumulate. Unfortunately, few of these toxicants are routinely tested for or identified until disease develops, and a syndrome diagnosis (based on signs/symptoms) is established. You may receive a diagnosis of an autoimmune condition, chronic fatigue syndrome or even Lyme disease (among others).

Mold is one of the most commonly missed and/or understated toxins of our lifetime. Many of us have had, or are currently experiencing an exposure to mold and its toxins (mycotoxins), and it may not be obvious. Identification is often challenging, and exposure can harm your system for years without a clear diagnosis.

Mold exposure can cause inflammation and toxicity in the body which further complicates symptoms from existing chronic illnesses. For example – many of our patients who already have chronic Lyme disease, neurological issues, cognitive decline, fibromyalgia and ME/CFS (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome) also have exposure to mold and the toxins that it creates – mycotoxins. In our clinical experience, treating the patient for mold exposure, and mycotoxins if it is also an issue, helps allow for their other multiple diagnoses to resolve faster.

It is said, if one works with Lyme, they will often find toxicity. The presence of such can be a predisposing factor or a relative result of the chronic illness itself. Many have developed increased sensitivities and poor detoxification responses after developing Lyme illness. Some were already exposed to the toxins themselves, suppressing and dysregulating their immune system response and allowing for a less favorable terrain and resilience to illness. Toxicity can be responsible for relapsing symptoms and can easily affect multiple different organ systems.

Other toxicants exist and should be evaluated for health/wellness and success of treatment are not to be understated either. This includes heavy metals, glyphosate, industrial, agricultural and water contaminants to name a few. These are also easily hidden from view as many are consumed or inhaled often with little immediate response.

We find diagnosis and appropriate treatment for mycotoxins and other environmental toxicants needs to precede and be concurrent with treatment for other chronic illnesses. Depending on each individual patient’s manifestation of symptoms and concurrent diagnoses, treatment may include oral, intravenous and physical therapies. Treatments are highly personalized to each patient.

There are many ways to support detoxification, some gentle and some more aggressive. The level of intervention is typically dependent on the overall toxic burden and constitution of the individual. This process is often gradual but has the potential to reestablish a more positive momentum of healing in the living system.

Allergies, Biotoxin Issues, Complex Chronic Illness, Jamie Kunkle ND, Mold / Mycotoxin Illness, Nafysa Parpia ND

Testing for Active Tickborne Disease

Play Video

Dr. Anderson: In the very beginning when I was treating tick-borne illness, in the 90’s, we had this idea of a full court press. We treated everything all at once, and we did five different antibiotics, and a few people survived that. Maybe 10%, 15% of people got better with that approach, the rest of the people it blew them out of the water.

So, I gradually developed a system of treatment where I appreciated that the immune system was like this great triage nurse. He or she was scanning the body and looking for what the most threatening pathogen was for the system. It’s never about one pathogen. It’s always an accumulation of pathogens, and they are all intermingling, and so many of them share similar symptoms.

And, in the moment, the immune system is telling us what it needs to do through the symptomatic presentation. Teaming up those symptoms with the pathogens helped me to appreciate, tuning into those symptoms helped me appreciate what needed to be treated first, because I was able to peel that off and weaken that dominant pathogen. Then the immune system was able to re-prioritize. This is the story that I told myself about it, the immune system would reprioritize and come up with another focus and that would have a different symptom presentation, often slightly different, but different enough to be able to tell the difference.

The Infectolab testing has given me results that reflect this way of thinking. It’s very important in how we deal with these infections, because in my experience, if we go at one pathogen at a time, and treat the most dominant pathogen and then the secondary pathogens, that’s the quickest way through treatment.

Complex Chronic Illness, Detox and Toxins, Lyme Disease + Coinfections, Tick Borne Illness, Wayne Anderson ND

Can Tick-Borne Illness Be Transmitted in Utero?

Dr. Nafysa Parpia discusses a case about tick-borne illness and in-utero transmission.

Play Video

Transcript (Dr. Nafysa Parpia)

This is a case about tickborne illness being transferred in utero.

I really love the Infectolab test, because it’s really been able to see what is real clinically, in comparison to what is real via laboratory diagnosis, in a way that I haven’t been able to see before. I just have one case of this in the lab, but I think that it’s telling and I can’t wait to do more cases like this with Infectolab.

Regarding maternal transmission of tickborne illness, there’s not much research on this, right? This case does strongly suggest maternal transmission, which is why I’m very happy with this lab, Because I wouldn’t be able to have a case where I was able to demonstrate something like this with a lab.

According to the CDC, untreated Lyme disease during pregnancy can lead to infection of the placenta. But spread from mother to fetus is possible, but rare. We see this in our clinic very often. OK, so we see people, we see families where the mother or the father has the diagnosis of tickborne illness and the kids do as well. But we’re not sure, we think, we always thought that yes, it was transmitted in utero. And there’s a little bit of research that shows, but we couldn’t really prove it in the labs. So, remember this is just an N of one, so we’re not calling it proof, but I feel like it’s on the way. If I can keep showing this in the labs I’ll feel more like we can prove that.

Know that our population is unusual. We only see chronically ill people. And because of that, our population is skewed to this group of people. That’s likely why we see such a high incidence of familial spread clinically. The population is growing, we see more and more than we did 10 years ago, our clinic is filled with people we have complex chronic illness and filled with families who have complex chronic illness.

Which is why I found this case so interesting. In this group of patients with more severe symptoms, we see a higher incidence of transmission in their offspring. But, still the CDC is just reporting on the population, on the general, the population at large. That’s not who comes to see us.

I want to get straight to the punch with respect to the labs. I’m going to talk about the family, and then we’re going to go straight to the labs results.

OK, so, a brief history. We’ll talk about symptomology after.

The mother, 48-year-old white female, she was bitten by a tick six or more years ago. Six to eight years ago. She has mold exposure in the house that was five years ago, and she kept, that family kept getting re-exposed to mold over five years.

There’s a daughter, she’s six, no tick bite known, but of course she had mold exposure since birth because the family kept getting mold exposure over the last five years.

Son, he’s five, no known tick bite, mold exposure since birth.

And the father has too, no known tick bite, And of course mold exposure.

They come to me with a diagnosis of only mycotoxin and mold illness. A doctor had diagnosed them with that and had tried to treat them, nothing happened. They got a little better here and there. They did get keep getting re-exposed to mold, which is a reason why they didn’t improve, but there was not a diagnosis of tick-borne illness. Nobody diagnosed them with that.

So, they come to me, wanting a treatment for mycotoxins and mold, and by their symptoms I think there’s something else going on as well as the mold and mycotoxin illness. Of course, I am thinking it’s tickborne illness based on their symptoms which will get into after.

Talking about the father, so just the Infectolab diagnosis.  I don’t have the labs showing up here, all three of them because it’s just too much paper, and I want to show you this side by side. So, I’ve tried to put things together on the slides as much as possible. In his Infectolab test, there’s no tick-borne illness diagnosed. At all! None! But he does have some cytomegalovirus, interferon gamma borderline, which means he’s fighting it off. A little bit, it’s there. That’s all he has. And of course, there’s mycotoxins and severe mold IgG allergens, which are elevated. Diagnosed by another lab.

Here I’m going to talk about the mother, the daughter, and the son. There’s a lot of writing on this slide. There are some important things all on the same slide so you can compare and see the sharing of the diagnoses.

The mother, she’s got, this is all by Infectolab now, she’s got Lyme, Bartonella, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, all positive in interferon gamma. Meaning that she’s, the infections are active in her right now.

Next, let’s talk about the daughter. Remember she’s just six. Take a look at the infections she has in common with the Mother. No tick bite known, okay? Lyme, Bartonella, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus. So, we see the exact same infections here. She’s got interferon gamma and interleukin two both positive. When I see that, I’m thinking, she’s in the process of getting her immune system under control, as evidenced by the interleukin two. These are from central memory T cells, which means that her body is beginning to tamp down the inflammatory response.

Now, we don’t know if this is because of a child’s strong immune system. We don’t have enough data on that. Or is it that we’re finding her right in that time between transmission and active infection resolution? I don’t know. I’d like to know, but we don’t have enough data on that. That’s a whole nother point in itself, but the main thing, the take home message here is that the mother and the daughter both have the same infections in common.  The mother has a history of a tick bite, the daughter doesn’t.

Now the son. He has Bartonella, interleukin two positive, Lyme, borderline interleukin two and interferon gamma, borderline, Ehrlichia, interleukin two and interferon gamma borderline, Epstein Barr virus, interleukin two borderline, the cytomegalovirus interleukin two, borderline.

The difference I see here is that he’s got Erhlichia, and his mother and sister don’t. Perhaps they did in the past, and that’s not apparent now in their immune system with either interferon gamma and interleukin two, or maybe he did have a tick bite which transmitted Ehlichia to him. I don’t know. It’s possible that he had a tick bite that the family isn’t aware of. According to them there was no tick bite, but sometimes they happen, right?  Even when people don’t know.

So, he appears to have a lot that’s borderline, but his mother and sister are currently fighting, and like his sister it’s likely that his immune system has fought off a lot of this. But most recently, he’s been getting Bartonella. According to his labs it’s just resolving.

Let me get to the next slide here.

So that was the piece that I wanted you all to see regarding how in this test this is a clear case of the likelihood, of the suggestion of tick-borne illness being transmitted in utero. We see the same infections all around for mother to children. With some exceptions here and there. I wouldn’t have been able to see this as clearly on other labs. Because here we’re looking at the immune system, looking at the interferon gamma and the interleukin two, and what is active right now.

I want to get into the clinical picture of these patients of mine. After talking about the labs, I thought it would be interesting for you to hear about their symptomology.

The clinical picture of the mother, she’s got this pain trifecta; shooting, burning, aching pain in her, myalgia and also in the joints. Typically, this is due to Bartonella, mold, and Lyme, that combination. Sure enough, on Infectolab, the Bartonella was raging, and so was the Lyme. So, her symptomology did correlate with what I found on Infectolab here.

And, brain fog. Lyme and mold more than Bartonella would typically cause brain fog. And, you know, her Lyme was raging as well, on the Lyme.

Extreme fatigue, likely from cytomegalovirus. Her cytomegalovirus was through the roof, I forgot to mention this, and so was her daughter’s. Like through the roof. And that was another way to, sorry, that’s another infection to think about transmission familialy, obviously that does happen. I just see how their immune systems handle it in a similar way. It was very interesting.

And of course, the fatigue could be due to the mold and tick-borne illness combination. So, they’re all consistent, all her symptoms are consistent with Lyme, Bartonella, Epstein Barr virus, cytomegalovirus all being active, but now I’m able to with this lab, I’m able to tease all that out. Better than before.

So now about the daughter. Her symptoms were constipation, could be due to tick borne illness, mold, mycotoxins, cytomegalovirus. They are new patients to me, so we’re also doing a GI panel. Could be due to parasites or other infections in the gut.

The puritis, likely due to Mast Cell Activation Syndrome or mold.

The fatigue is minor in her. Could be due to tick-borne illness, mold, and cytomegalovirus. So, her symptoms are not as severe as her mother’s, and this is consistent with a finding of no interleukin two in the mother, while she has significant interleukin two. This is another piece of the lab I really like. So, looking at the interleukin two, we can see that these infections are beginning to resolve. And likewise, her symptoms are not as bad now than previous to her being diagnosed.

OK, so on to the son. He had fits of rage as his primary, primary symptom. In fact, there’s no pain, there’s no fatigue, it’s all rage, and that is consistent with Bartonella. His Bartonella is now interleukin two positive, and that suggests that he’s resolving this infection. The interesting piece is that before he came to me, he was having fits of rage about 7-8 times a day, and now they’re three times a day. So that would make sense that the parents were telling me that when he was having fits 7-8 times a day, several months ago, it’s very different to now, with the fits three times a day. If you think several months ago, likely, his interferon gamma was positive, and now that he’s got interleukin two, it’s likely that his fits of rage are decreased because of that, because there is some healing happening, there’s some resolution of this infection happening.  

But really, really important to note is that the behavior pattern was likely established by the Bartonella, so it’s a classic Bartonella mental piece. However, when a neurological or mental or physiological piece is established by any infection, and that infection resolves, the body knows that pattern, and another infection or toxin can come in and carry on that pattern. So, very similar to what Dr. Gordon was saying with his case, that the tick-borne infection was resolved, but there’s a pattern there that still will be carried. Do we continue on with antibiotic therapy, or any therapy to resolve the infection, or do we work on regenerative medicine? Pieces to modulate the damage that had been done by the infections or the toxic things we’re talking about.

So, with the Bartonella here, I’m seeing that he’s still having Bartonella fits of rage. They’re less than previously, and I’m seeing the interleukin two positive, meaning he’s pretty much resolved this now. So, why’s he still having those fits? Do I need to treat for Bartonella? No, I’m not going to treat for Bartonella very much, or at least not very aggressively, because this lab is showing me it’s mostly resolved now. So, I’m going to treat for the other infections that I’ve diagnosed with him, diagnosed him with, and other toxicants I’ve diagnosed him with to undo the patterns the Bartonella created.

So, thank you guys! That’s my piece and it’s some, seems pretty clear to me in this lab that there was transmission from mother to children in utero, because she did get that tick bite before she had her children, and apparently her children did not have tick bites.

Biotoxin Issues, Lyme Disease - Pediatric, Lyme Disease + Coinfections, Mold / Mycotoxin Illness, Nafysa Parpia ND, Video Blogs

They Can’t Find Anything Wrong

So Why Do I Feel So Bad?

Diagnosis at its best implies finding the cause of the disease. Thinking in linear cause and effect mode was reinforced by advances in surgery for traumatic injuries, and in the discovery of antibiotics for infectious disease. The ingrained habit for doctor and patient is to find the right diagnosis and then the correct treatment will be straight forward and hopefully effective.

Chronic complex illness does not follow this pattern. The problem is not just the inciting event or the viral or bacterial trigger. In chronic illness it is the variety of the person’s genetics and environmental experience that often matter more than the triggering event. Environmental experience includes the totality of our life experience: our physical environment, our chemical and electronic exposures, our socio-economic cultural group, and our psychological and spiritual issues and beliefs.

Thanks to metabolomics, we are now starting to see testing that reveals what is happening in the body NOW, as a result of the past and the present coming together.

Find out more at our page on Complex Chronic Illness

 

Hope for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - Image by engin akyurt from PixabayIn medicine doctors usually work toward a diagnosis. Diagnosis at its best implies finding the cause of the disease. Thinking in linear cause and effect mode was reinforced by advances in surgery for traumatic injuries, and in the discovery of antibiotics for infectious disease. The ingrained habit for doctor and patient is to find the right diagnosis and then the correct treatment will be straight forward and hopefully effective.

Chronic complex illness does not follow this pattern. The problem is not just the inciting event or the viral or bacterial trigger. In chronic illness it is the variety of the person’s genetics and environmental experience that often matter more than the triggering event. Environmental experience includes the totality of our life experience: our physical environment, our chemical and electronic exposures, our socio-economic cultural group, and our psychological and spiritual issues and beliefs.

The problem with all symptoms is that they are internal experiences we all struggle to express in ways that another person can understand. This is difficult even when we agree on basic definitions, but doctors are trained to think about symptoms in very specific ways, while patients are not. So often, a stomach ache means one thing to your doctor – a pain somewhere in the area just below your ribs in the midline, or a bit to the left, or maybe to the right of midline of your abdomen. To the patient it could mean a pain below the belly button, or a generalized ache in the entire abdominal area. Maybe the word ache itself doesn’t mean the same thing to patient and doctor, as there are so many types of pain, each indicating something different could be wrong.

How does the diagnostic thinking proceed when you complain of stomach pain? The doctor’s first priority is to rule out, as we say in medical jargon, whether the cause of the pain is life threatening in origin. The appropriate questions and physical exam usually deal with this issue 90% of the time, and depending on your age and sex, may or may not require more in depth investigation. The problem we face with chronic illness is that the stomach pain that you have is usually not the mild gastritis seen on endoscopy, usually attributed to excess acid or H. Pylori infection. For people with chronic illness there may be multiple small stressors to the stomach that can add up to severe stomach problems, but often fail to show up when our focus is ruling out “serious “ problems.

Things that may contribute or even cause severe stomach pain include mild forms of Mast Cell Activation Disorder (MCAD) or (MCAS), intestinal dysbiosis, elevated but “normal” porphyrins, vagal nerve irritation from tight muscles or fascia along the vagal nerve’s course, and musculoskeletal problems – especially of the mid thoracic area, fascial strain patterns in the chest and abdomen or pelvis which affects proper blood and lymph flow to and from the involved organ. Infectious contributors can include low grade infections with Lyme or Bartonella, which would be missed if all you are looking for is H. Pylori. Viral infections, or gall bladder and pancreatic dysfunction can also be missed if you are not looking deeper.

Notice I refer to dysfunction. This includes the mild decrease in function from age and toxins that most of us take in stride. When another mild low grade problem is also present, let’s say a tendency to hypercoagulability, along with being chronically dehydrated, maybe a little low in calcium, and a tendency for your mast cells to over react and release chemicals that cause a bit of swelling, and all come together with a low grade infection, then suddenly the blood supply and lymph drainage hits a tipping point and you have stomach pain. You may also begin to react to foods that never bothered you before, or even to inhaled irritants that end up affecting your stomach.

What is the diagnosis here? All your tests are within normal limits, but you are at the high end of normal in some of these, and the low end in others, or just a bit out of range for normal, but not quite showing a disease. Symptomatic, but all tests “normal.

We tend to blame the immune system, but there is only the body system. We made artificial groupings of bodily functions in order to study and learn how it works. The problem is, we keep forgetting the whole body is a system. We investigate its parts, but it works as a whole.

Our job as medical practitioners isn’t just to look for the inciting cause, the bullet if you will. With chronic complex illness we have to peel back the layers of over and under function of your whole body. We have to find what imbalances in you allowed an insult, whether infection, toxin exposure, physical or emotional trauma, to have caused persistent ongoing symptoms rather than the usual short term illness and recovery.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Complex Chronic Illness, Detox and Toxins, Eric Gordon MD, Lyme Disease + Coinfections, Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS), Mold / Mycotoxin Illness, Tick Borne Illness

The Cell Danger Response: Inflammation and the Healing Cycle

Inflammation is the body’s normal response to danger. The body’s inflammatory response is meant to be transient – when that response is ongoing, and especially when the inciting event (pathogens, toxic elements) persists, the normal tamping down of inflammation doesn’t occur. When inflammation persists and the Healing Cycle is not completed the clinical presentation is an outcome of their genetic tendencies.

Naviaux RK. Metabolic features of the cell danger response.

Other perpetuating factors of a persistent Cell Danger Response can include:

  • Concurrent infectious loads (fungi, parasites, viruses, dysbiosis, occult dental infections, PANS. Symptoms of some infections may be suppressed until other infections are treated.
  • Structural issues, lax ligaments, Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (EDS), Cranial-Cervical Instability, vagal nerve issues.
  • Increased intestinal permeability – food allergies, increased toxin load, translocation between vagus nerve at the gut up to the brain, decreased nutrient absorption, a stressed liver.
  • Hypercoagulability – excess soluble fibrin or elevated homocysteine.
  • Psychological defense strategies, PTSD, OCD, anxiety.
  • Early childhood adverse events (physical and/or psychological).
  • Don’t ignore the potential of chronic jaw infections from root canals and old wisdom teeth extraction sites to derail treatment.
  • Sinus colonization – It’s more than Marcons!

See more information about treatment of complex chronic illness at GMA.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Eric Gordon MD, Immune Issues, Lyme Disease + Coinfections

Preventing the Failed Patient – Detoxification

Environmental toxicants impair cellular functions. Lyme/tick-borne disease/co-infections, parasites, and viruses all modulate immune function to their advantage and the host disadvantage. With exposure, the immune system is overactivated, causing hypersensitivity, allergies, mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS), and/or autoimmunity. The immune system may also be misdirected, and does not mount an appropriate response to infection.

Most of our patients who present with long standing Lyme disease have evidence of a high environmental toxicant load through clinical history and laboratory results. They respond well to therapies that reduce the toxicant load, which leads to normalization of the immune response. Everyone benefits from detox, but in these patients, it is mandatory.

Toxicants that hinder the healing cycle may include: mold toxins, biotoxins and other neurotoxins, heavy metals, high EMF exposure or high sensitivity to it, environmental toxin burden such as high perchlorate, PCBs, glyphosate (Roundup), other pesticides and other chemicals.

Consider whether you:

  • Live/lived in a home with mold or water damage?
  • Live/lived near or on a farm or vineyard? how far from?
  • Live/lived near freeway? How far from?
  • Live/lived in an industrial location?
  • Live/lived in home while it was being renovated?
  • Ever worked with chemicals – artist, dark room, painting/renovating homes, industrial work?
  • Use pesticides, insecticides, herbicides in your garden or your neighbors use them in their gardens?
  • Have metal amalgams in your mouth?

Treatment for toxins needs to precede and be concurrent with herbal and antibiotic treatment of persistent tick-borne disease. It includes appropriate oral, IV and physical detoxification therapies PLUS MCAS treatment. If mast cell activation is on a hair trigger even detox may cause flares.

Biotoxin Issues, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Complex Chronic Illness, Detox and Toxins, Detoxification, Lyme Disease + Coinfections, Nafysa Parpia ND, Toxicity

How Long Will Treatment Take?

When new patients make their first appointments, they usually have many questions about how long they should plan to stay with us at GMA. Understandably, they get frustrated when we cannot answer those questions with any kind of specificity.

Here’s the problem:

Before we actually get a chance to take a patient’s history and examine them thoroughly, it really is not possible to formulate a therapeutic treatment program. Some patients insist that if we reviewed their massive medical records, in advance of their arrival, surely we could tell them how long their treatment will take.

Let us try to explain why this isn’t possible.

First of all, it is illegal for any physician to make a diagnosis or treat a patient without a complete history and physical first, taken in person with the patient. 

That technicality notwithstanding, the complexity of our patients make it virtually impossible to design a treatment program without delving into the details of their medical lives first. Often the information we really need is not in their medical record. Most of our patients are extremely complicated.

They usually have some combination of Lyme disease with multiple co-infections, mold toxicity, allergies, chemical sensitivities, mast cell disorders, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, chronic viral infections, coupled with a bewildering combination of other medical diagnoses.

If that wasn’t complicated enough, because of each person’s individual biochemistry and genetics, combined with the way they process stress and spiritual/emotional upheaval and cope with their illness, those named illnesses play out very differently for each individual patient. Our patients are far more sensitive to medications, supplements, homeopathics, chemicals and electromagnetic radiation than most; some exquisitely so.

The variability of that sensitivity is difficult for most people to grasp – some of our most sensitive patients can take large amounts of antibiotics, but even the tiniest dose of a homeopathic remedy throws them completely out-of-kilter. Often the only way to know how they will respond is to try.

So, our task, when we begin the process of helping a new patient to heal, is not only to clarify the diagnosis (which is difficult enough), but to stratify those diagnoses into layers, attempting to identify with as much precision as possible, exactly which layer requires the most immediate attention and will lead to the most immediate benefits. Adding to this difficulty is that for each individual we must delve into their sensitivities so that we can determine not only what they need initially, but how much they can handle initially so that we can begin to make forward progress.

Alas, there is not a lot of science that will allow us to do this properly. We have been working for some time with a variety of diagnostic aids (electrodermal, kinesiological, and microscopic, for example) but those have never proven to be as accurate as we hope, and need them to be, to bring true precision to these important decisions. We have therefore come to rely on our experience, our knowledge, and our own personal sensitivities to our patient’s descriptions to make these difficult decisions.

As Dr. Gordon describes this, “it is like pinning the tail on the donkey with a blindfold on, but we peek.”

When patients come to spend time with us, we cannot know in advance what they will need, or how they will react to our suggestions or treatments. Every day is new. We have the privilege of treating a number of delightful patients from Europe – they have come a long way to see us, but every day they need to report to us how they responded to what we did yesterday, so we can formulate the treatment program for today. Those responses change from day to day, and so do treatments. 

Although we may know what my first day’s treatment will consist of, their response will alter what we do next. We might start with one type of intravenous treatment and switch to another, or add another medication, or reduce the dose, or increase the dose, or add Frequency Specific Microcurrent or the neurofeedback, or a wide variety of detoxification options – all based on their individual response.

This description is a microcosm of the treatment program: a constantly shifting, changing response to each being as they begin or complete each phase of our program. That response requires that both the patient and the practitioner communicate as clearly as possible on a regular basis and that each is ready to re-think or change what we are doing as the clinical picture evolves. When we do this we find that the vast majority of the time good things happen (but not always on our time table). The best results happen when we both (patient and practitioner) have the flexibility to optimally respond to changes as they arise.

Autoimmunity, Detox and Toxins, HEALTH CONDITIONS, Post Covid / Long Haul, THERAPIES